International Swimming League locks in CBC Sports rights deal

Canadian public broadcaster commits to linear and streaming coverage of first season.

2 October 2019 Sam Carp
SHARE THIS ARTICLE

The International Swimming League (ISL) has announced a multi-platform media rights deal with Canadian public service broadcaster CBC Sports.

The deal will see CBC provide broadcast and streaming coverage of the inaugural season of the city-based, franchise-oriented swimming league, starting with the first meet on 5th and 6th October in Indianapolis.

CBC will offer live streams from all seven meets via its website and official app, as well as on the free CBC Gem streaming service. Broadcast coverage will feature on CBC’s Road to the Olympic Games show as part of the network’s build-up to Tokyo 2020.

A total of 13 Canadian swimmers are competing in the opening season of the ISL, which features 16 teams and events split across the US and Europe.

Chris Wilson, executive director of sports and Olympics at CBC, said: “Team Canada has amazing depth in the pool, and CBC Sports is thrilled to offer Canadians the opportunity to watch our country’s elite swimmers compete against the best on the planet, offering a preview of what to look forward to at the Olympic Games in Tokyo next year.”

CBC is the latest major broadcaster to land rights to the ISL, following a deal between the competition and Discovery-owned pan-European broadcaster Eurosport covering Europe and the Asia-Pacific region, as well as a tie-up with Australia’s free-to-air Seven Network.

ISL president Konstantin Grigorishin added: “This agreement is another great step for this new professional league, and we are delighted that millions of sports fans in Canada will be able to watch the first edition of the ISL.”

The eight-team ISL is planning to revolutionise swimming with its unique competition format, which will swimmers compete for points during two-hour matches comprising sprint, relay and skin races. The first season will see US$180,000 in prize money awarded at each regular season meet, with US$1.5 million up for grabs at the championship event in Las Vegas. 

The International Swimming League (ISL) has announced a multi-platform media rights deal with Canadian public service broadcaster CBC Sports.

The deal will see CBC provide broadcast and streaming coverage of the inaugural season of the city-based, franchise-oriented swimming league, starting with the first meet on 5th and 6th October in Indianapolis.

CBC will offer live streams from all seven meets via its website and official app, as well as on the free CBC Gem streaming service. Broadcast coverage will feature on CBC’s Road to the Olympic Games show as part of the network’s build-up to Tokyo 2020.

A total of 13 Canadian swimmers are competing in the opening season of the ISL, which features 16 teams and events split across the US and Europe.

Chris Wilson, executive director of sports and Olympics at CBC, said: “Team Canada has amazing depth in the pool, and CBC Sports is thrilled to offer Canadians the opportunity to watch our country’s elite swimmers compete against the best on the planet, offering a preview of what to look forward to at the Olympic Games in Tokyo next year.”

CBC is the latest major broadcaster to land rights to the ISL, following a deal between the competition and Discovery-owned pan-European broadcaster Eurosport covering Europe and the Asia-Pacific region, as well as a tie-up with Australia’s free-to-air Seven Network.

ISL president Konstantin Grigorishin added: “This agreement is another great step for this new professional league, and we are delighted that millions of sports fans in Canada will be able to watch the first edition of the ISL.”

The eight-team ISL is planning to revolutionise swimming with its unique competition format, which will swimmers compete for points during two-hour matches comprising sprint, relay and skin races. The first season will see US$180,000 in prize money awarded at each regular season meet, with US$1.5 million up for grabs at the championship event in Las Vegas. 

Getty Images